Head of School Welcome

How does global cooperation impact global health?

Invest especially in the young for they are the hope of the future 

Jean-Gailhac, Founder of the RSHM

A Marymount education is based upon a commitment to the integral development and liberation of the human person.  We are called to educate every child, each with their own intellectual and moral faculties, so they become agents of transformation for justice and peace in a multicultural and multi-religious world.

Meaningful, experiential learning is a hallmark of this educational model - experience, nurtured by reflection, results in discovery and then action.  The RSHM Student Leadership Retreat tackles current global issues and incites students to harness their individual intellects for collective action and change. The program is a beautiful example of how experiential learning can shape the spiritual, intellectual, and cultural development of young people, and is a collaborative labor of love that was designed and is led by the Eastern American Providence Marymount schools in England, France, and Italy.  

The theme of the 2020 RSHM Student Leadership Retreat is a unifying objective and a call to action: How does global cooperation impact global health?  For our students, normal life became a very poignant experiential learning curve as we navigated the global COVID-19 pandemic from a place of relative stability and safety.  The direct impact of the critical issue of global health - and its link to global peace - was felt indiscriminately in every school and home. It has also laid bare the vast inequities in global health, education and income that linger over our children's future.

As the students grapple with existential questions such as ‘how does the bigger world impact my life?”, “how can I affect positive and principled change?”, “how can I stand up for what is right, even when - and especially if - it is hard?”, they are guided by the principles of the RSHM Student Leadership:

  • Inspire and empower students to regard themselves as social advocates for peace and justice within their local and global communities
  • Help students realize that the best understanding of an issue stems from gathering and listening to multiple perspectives 
  • Foster reflection and dialogue with other student leaders on best practices that invite, maximize and sustain community partners in our social justice mission
  • Provide students with practical tools to design, manage and carry out service projects that address identified, well-researched community service projects

Livia Malcangio - Director, Institutional Relations and Protocol, Permanent Secretariat of the World Summit of Nobel Peace Laureates

Sarah Thomas - Marymount Paris Head of School

17th Nobel Peace Summit, Mérida, México - September 2019.

 

This year, it is a unique privilege for Marymount schools to partner with the Permanent Secretariat of the World Summit of Nobel Peace Laureates.  The Leading by Example program, which was started by the Permanent Secretariat in 2012, has gathered over 4500 youth worldwide to create and develop their own projects for peace at a community level by providing educational opportunities for them to engage in dialogue about peace and human rights. When the seeds of our collaboration were first sowed in 2018, it was abundantly clear how the objectives of our respective institutions converged and I felt personally and professionally compelled to foster a meeting of young minds. The inspiration and example of Nobel Peace Laureates, and exposure to their challenges and triumphs, are vital reminders that youth is not an obstacle for change - quite the opposite.

As we embark on this partnership, my personal thanks go to Ekaterina Zagladina - President of the Permanent Secretariat of the World Summit of Nobel Peace Laureates.  Ekaterina is a unique woman whose humility belies her remarkable achievements.  Her commitment to peace education and her confidence in the ability of young people to affect positive change are inspirational.  

We are indebted to Livia Mancangio for accepting to tell the unique stories of Nobel Peace Laureates and share her first-hand experience with our students, and for publishing this Special Edition of Being Nobel as a symbol of our shared commitment to global peace. 

We also thank Viktoria Devdariani, and Irina Tutberidze from the Permanent Secretariat for their vision, dedication and influence.

Finally, I would like to take the opportunity to salute Lisa Huet, the Middle School Social Studies teacher and Student Implementation Committee Advisor.  Ms Huet’s intellect, expertise and generosity of spirit make her an exceptional international educator and role model. The ongoing development of the RSHM Student Leadership Retreat would not have been possible without her.

Sarah Thomas
Head of School, Marymount Paris